A ‘Band-Aid’ for 800 children

Nora Sandigo is guardian to hundreds of U.S. citizens born to illegal immigrants who are subject to deportation.

he first emergency phone call of the morning is the one that wakes her up, and Nora Sandigo, 48, answers one of the three phones she keeps within reach of her bed. “Hello. How can I help?” she says, because someone is always asking for her help. She gets up, pours herself coffee and takes down notes as she listens. “Sebastian. 12. U.S. citizen,” she writes. “Father deported. Mother detained. Drs appointment today, 2:45.”

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Source: The Washington Post

Original publication date: 07/05/ 2014

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One Woman, 817 Children: Caring For Kids Of Undocumented Parents

The recent increase in the number of unaccompanied, undocumented minors immigrating across the border has left tens of thousands of children waiting in limbo. But thousands of children who are already American citizens also face an uncertain future — because their parents are not in the country legally.

If their parents get deported, those minors could end up in foster care, or adopted by strangers.

Nora Sandigo is the legal guardian of 817 American children of undocumented immigrants. Should a parent be deported, Sandigo steps in to arrange care for the children they leave behind. In many cases she cares for the children herself, temporarily. Eventually, they are placed with family or family friends who receive background screenings and get support from Sandigo as needed.

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Source: NPR

Original publication date: 07/27/2014

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Miami Woman Is the Legal Guardian to Over 900 Children: ‘I Love Every Single One of Them Like They’re My Own’

Nora Sandigo answered a frantic knock at the front door of her Miami home in 2009, and six years later,
that door has never closed.

“These two young children were standing there so scared. Their mother from Nicaragua was being deported,” Sandigo tells PEOPLE. “They needed help. I said, ‘You will never be alone.’ ”

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Source: People

Original publication date: 09/24/2015

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